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Romans 7:20 - Doing the Wrong Thing Bookmark

But sin that dwelleth in me - the principle of sin, which has possessed itself of all my carnal appetites and passions, and thus subjects my reason and domineers over my soul.   Thus I am in perpetual contradiction to myself….This strange self-contradictory propensity led some of the ancient philosophers to imagine that man has two souls, a good and a bad one….(Dr. Adam Clarke)

But the whole good on which his will is fully bent, he does not do; sin ever springing up in him, through remaining corruption, he often does evil, though against the fixed determination of his will. (Matthew Henry)

But if I am doing the very thing I do not want, I am no longer the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. (NASB)

Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me. (KJV)

But if I do what I don't want to do, I am not really the one doing wrong; it is sin living in me that does it. (NLT)

Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer me doing it but sin that lives in me. (NET)

We have thus learned three things:

1.  In me, that is in my flesh, ther is no good thng.
2.  I will do good but sin wills otherwise.
3.  Whan I will to do good, sin is too strong for me to succeed.

Deliverance is what I then must seek and deliverance is what is found in Christ Jesus!  Deliverance is found only when are convicted by the Holy Spirit and illuminated by His light to the fact that we are incapable of self-deliverance and are in great need of His power to deliver us.  The new world order is now in effect (Jesus in my heart).  The old world order is Sin, the very headwaters of my fallen estate.

Rom 7:20 
It is no more I - My will is against it; my reason and conscience condemn it.  But sin that dwelleth in me - the principle of sin, which has possessed itself of all my carnal appetites and passions, and thus subjects my reason and domineers over my soul.  Thus I am in perpetual contradiction to myself.  Two principles are continually contending in me for the mastery: my reason, on which the light of God shines, to show what is evil; and my passions, in which the principle of sin works, to bring forth fruit unto death.

This strange self-contradictory propensity led some of the ancient philosophers to imagine that man has two souls, a good and a bad one; and it is on this principle that Xenophon, in his life of Cyrus, causes Araspes, a Persian nobleman, to account for some misconduct of his relative to Panthea, a beautiful female captive, whom Cyrus had entrusted to his care: - “O Cyrus, I am convinced that I have two souls; if I had but one soul, it could not at the same time pant after vice and virtue; wish and abhor the same thing. It is certain, therefore, that we have two souls; when the good soul rules, I undertake noble and virtuous actions; but when the bad soul predominates, I am constrained to do evil. All I can say at present is that I find my good soul, encouraged by thy presence, has got the better of my bad soul.” See Spectator, vol. viii. No. 564. Thus, not only the ancients, but also many moderns, have trifled, and all will continue to do so who do not acknowledge the Scriptural account of the fall of man, and the lively comment upon that doctrine contained in the seventh chapter of the Epistle to the Romans. (Dr. Adam Clarke)

The evil here spoken of is the evil that is in our nature, and the want of power to get rid of it. The forgiveness of sins had been fully taught.  What distresses here is the present working of sin which we cannot get rid of the sense of this is often a more painful thing than past sins, which the believer can understand as put away by the blood of Christ.  But here we have the conscience of sin still in us, though we may hate it, and the question of deliverance is mixed up with our experience, at least till we have learned what is taught us in this part of the epistle, to judge the old man as sin in us, not ourselves, and reckon ourselves dead. Christ, through whom we now live, having died, and being a sacrifice for sin, our condemnation is impossible, while sin is condemned and we free through "the law of the Spirit of life in him."  It is not forgiveness, but deliverance, sin in the flesh being condemned in the cross. (Dr. John Darby)

But sin that dwelleth in me - the principle of sin, which has possessed itself of all my carnal appetites and passions, and thus subjects my reason and domineers over my soul.   Thus I am in perpetual contradiction to myself….This strange self-contradictory propensity led some of the ancient philosophers to imagine that man has two souls, a good and a bad one….(Dr. Adam Clarke)

But the whole good on which his will is fully bent, he does not do; sin ever springing up in him, through remaining corruption, he often does evil, though against the fixed determination of his will. (Matthew Henry)

But if I am doing the very thing I do not want, I am no longer the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. (NASB)

Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me. (KJV)

But if I do what I don't want to do, I am not really the one doing wrong; it is sin living in me that does it. (NLT)

Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer me doing it but sin that lives in me. (NET)

We have thus learned three things:

1.  In me, that is in my flesh, ther is no good thng.
2.  I will do good but sin wills otherwise.
3.  Whan I will to do good, sin is too strong for me to succeed.

Deliverance is what I then must seek and deliverance is what is found in Christ Jesus!  Deliverance is found only when are convicted by the Holy Spirit and illuminated by His light to the fact that we are incapable of self-deliverance and are in great need of His power to deliver us.  The new world order is now in effect (Jesus in my heart).  The old world order is Sin, the very headwaters of my fallen estate.

Rom 7:20 
It is no more I - My will is against it; my reason and conscience condemn it.  But sin that dwelleth in me - the principle of sin, which has possessed itself of all my carnal appetites and passions, and thus subjects my reason and domineers over my soul.  Thus I am in perpetual contradiction to myself.  Two principles are continually contending in me for the mastery: my reason, on which the light of God shines, to show what is evil; and my passions, in which the principle of sin works, to bring forth fruit unto death.

This strange self-contradictory propensity led some of the ancient philosophers to imagine that man has two souls, a good and a bad one; and it is on this principle that Xenophon, in his life of Cyrus, causes Araspes, a Persian nobleman, to account for some misconduct of his relative to Panthea, a beautiful female captive, whom Cyrus had entrusted to his care: - “O Cyrus, I am convinced that I have two souls; if I had but one soul, it could not at the same time pant after vice and virtue; wish and abhor the same thing. It is certain, therefore, that we have two souls; when the good soul rules, I undertake noble and virtuous actions; but when the bad soul predominates, I am constrained to do evil. All I can say at present is that I find my good soul, encouraged by thy presence, has got the better of my bad soul.” See Spectator, vol. viii. No. 564. Thus, not only the ancients, but also many moderns, have trifled, and all will continue to do so who do not acknowledge the Scriptural account of the fall of man, and the lively comment upon that doctrine contained in the seventh chapter of the Epistle to the Romans. (Dr. Adam Clarke)

The evil here spoken of is the evil that is in our nature, and the want of power to get rid of it. The forgiveness of sins had been fully taught.  What distresses here is the present working of sin which we cannot get rid of the sense of this is often a more painful thing than past sins, which the believer can understand as put away by the blood of Christ.  But here we have the conscience of sin still in us, though we may hate it, and the question of deliverance is mixed up with our experience, at least till we have learned what is taught us in this part of the epistle, to judge the old man as sin in us, not ourselves, and reckon ourselves dead. Christ, through whom we now live, having died, and being a sacrifice for sin, our condemnation is impossible, while sin is condemned and we free through "the law of the Spirit of life in him."  It is not forgiveness, but deliverance, sin in the flesh being condemned in the cross. (Dr. John Darby)



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