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Romans 8:1 - Now No Condemnation

Romans 8:1 - Now No Condemnation Bookmark

Rom 8:1  There is therefore now no condemnation - Either for things present or past. Now he comes to deliverance and liberty. The apostle here resumes the thread of his discourse, which was interrupted, Romans 7:7.  (John Wesley)

CONDEMNATION, n.
1. The act of condemning; the judicial act of declaring one guilty, and dooming him to punishment.
For the judgment was by one to condemnation. Rom 5.
2. The state of being condemned.
Dost thou not fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation. Luke 23.
3. The cause or reason of a sentence of condemnation. John 3.

Therefore there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. (NASB)

There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. (KJV)

So now there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus. (NLT)

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. (NET)

We find here a conclusion drawn of all that has preceded from chapter 1 verse 16.  Where we were once objects of God's holy wrath, condemned under the law, but now by faith, having died with Christ and have been set free from the law, are now declared to be grafted into Him.  We are, in Christ, not guilty and delivered from the punishment for our sins.  As Dr. Zodhiates points out with the contrast from Romans 5:16 that this resulted from the Lordship of Christ in our lives.  We have been given liberty but are no longer freeman but bond-slaves of our Lord and Savior, no longer living for ourselves but living for Christ who died for us and was raised for us (2 Cor 5:15 paraphrase mine).

2 Cor 5:15  He died for everyone so that those who receive His new life will no longer live for themselves. Instead, they will live for Christ, who died and was raised for them.

G2631
κατάκριμα
katákrima; gen. katakrímatos, neut. noun from katakrínō (G2632), to condemn.  The suffix -ma makes it the result of judgment. A decision against someone, a condemnatory judgment.  Only in Romans 5:16, Romans 5:18; Romans 8:1.  In verse sixteen, contrast dikaíōma (G1345) justification, the right given to the believer as a result of his acknowledgment of the lordship of God in his life.  In verse eighteen katákrima contrasted with a more definite dikaíōsis (G1347) justification, the act of making life righteous; therefore, a judgment of condemnation in the sense of the economy of redemption. (The Complete Word Study Dictionary, General Editor: Spiros Zodhiates, Th.D.)

Rom 5:16  And the result of God's gracious gift is very different from the result of that one man's sin. For Adam's sin led to condemnation, but God's free gift leads to our being made right with God, even though we are guilty of many sins. (NLT)

Rom 5:16  And the gift is not like the one who sinned. For judgment, resulting from the one transgression, led to condemnation, but the gracious gift from the many failures led to justification. (NET)

Rom 5:18  Yes, Adam's one sin brings condemnation for everyone, but Christ's one act of righteousness brings a right relationship with God and new life for everyone. (NLT)

Rom 5:18  Consequently, just as condemnation for all people came through one transgression, so too through the one righteous act came righteousness leading to life for all people. (NET)

So when the shadow of your past comes knocking (and it will) we can remember that we are no longer condemned for the things we have done, nor the things we may yet do.  Even when we trip over our own shoelaces we remain safe in the arms of Christ.

The verse does not say “no mistakes” or “no failures,” or even “no sins.” Christians do fail and make mistakes, and they do sin. Abraham lied about his wife; David committed adultery; Peter tried to kill a man with his sword. To be sure, they suffered consequences because of their sins, but they did not suffer condemnation. (The Bible exposition commentary.)

I don't mean to say that I have already achieved these things or that I have already reached perfection. But I press on to possess that perfection for which Christ Jesus first possessed me. No, dear brothers and sisters, I have not achieved it, but I focus on this one thing: Forgetting the past and looking forward to what lies ahead, I press on to reach the end of the race and receive the heavenly prize for which God, through Christ Jesus, is calling us. (Philippians 3:12-14 NLT)

One must notice immediately the additional clause rendered in Romans 8:1 in the King James Version.  I have included a couple of notes that well explain the accepted probabilities.  The addition adds the obvious and its omission detracts nothing.

This last clause is wanting in the principal MSS., versions, and fathers. Griesbach has excluded it from the text; and Dr. White says, Certissime delenda; it should most undoubtedly be expunged. Without it, the passage reads thus: There is, therefore, no condemnation to them that are in Christ Jesus; for the law of the Spirit of life, etc. It is a fairly assumed point, that those who are in Christ Jesus, who believe in his name, have redemption in his blood; are made partakers of his Spirit, and have the mind in them that was in him; will not walk after the flesh, but after the Spirit: therefore the thing itself is included in the being in Christ, whether it be expressed or not: and it was probably to make the thing more obvious, that this explanatory clause was added by some copyist, for it does not appear to have made an original part of the text; and it is most likely that it was inserted here from the fourth verse. (Dr. Adam Clarke)

 

Rom 8:1  There is therefore now no condemnation - Either for things present or past. Now he comes to deliverance and liberty. The apostle here resumes the thread of his discourse, which was interrupted, Romans 7:7.  (John Wesley)

CONDEMNATION, n.
1. The act of condemning; the judicial act of declaring one guilty, and dooming him to punishment.
For the judgment was by one to condemnation. Rom 5.
2. The state of being condemned.
Dost thou not fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation. Luke 23.
3. The cause or reason of a sentence of condemnation. John 3.

Therefore there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. (NASB)

There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. (KJV)

So now there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus. (NLT)

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. (NET)

We find here a conclusion drawn of all that has preceded from chapter 1 verse 16.  Where we were once objects of God's holy wrath, condemned under the law, but now by faith, having died with Christ and have been set free from the law, are now declared to be grafted into Him.  We are, in Christ, not guilty and delivered from the punishment for our sins.  As Dr. Zodhiates points out with the contrast from Romans 5:16 that this resulted from the Lordship of Christ in our lives.  We have been given liberty but are no longer freeman but bond-slaves of our Lord and Savior, no longer living for ourselves but living for Christ who died for us and was raised for us (2 Cor 5:15 paraphrase mine).

2 Cor 5:15  He died for everyone so that those who receive His new life will no longer live for themselves. Instead, they will live for Christ, who died and was raised for them.

G2631
κατάκριμα
katákrima; gen. katakrímatos, neut. noun from katakrínō (G2632), to condemn.  The suffix -ma makes it the result of judgment. A decision against someone, a condemnatory judgment.  Only in Romans 5:16, Romans 5:18; Romans 8:1.  In verse sixteen, contrast dikaíōma (G1345) justification, the right given to the believer as a result of his acknowledgment of the lordship of God in his life.  In verse eighteen katákrima contrasted with a more definite dikaíōsis (G1347) justification, the act of making life righteous; therefore, a judgment of condemnation in the sense of the economy of redemption. (The Complete Word Study Dictionary, General Editor: Spiros Zodhiates, Th.D.)

Rom 5:16  And the result of God's gracious gift is very different from the result of that one man's sin. For Adam's sin led to condemnation, but God's free gift leads to our being made right with God, even though we are guilty of many sins. (NLT)

Rom 5:16  And the gift is not like the one who sinned. For judgment, resulting from the one transgression, led to condemnation, but the gracious gift from the many failures led to justification. (NET)

Rom 5:18  Yes, Adam's one sin brings condemnation for everyone, but Christ's one act of righteousness brings a right relationship with God and new life for everyone. (NLT)

Rom 5:18  Consequently, just as condemnation for all people came through one transgression, so too through the one righteous act came righteousness leading to life for all people. (NET)

So when the shadow of your past comes knocking (and it will) we can remember that we are no longer condemned for the things we have done, nor the things we may yet do.  Even when we trip over our own shoelaces we remain safe in the arms of Christ.

The verse does not say “no mistakes” or “no failures,” or even “no sins.” Christians do fail and make mistakes, and they do sin. Abraham lied about his wife; David committed adultery; Peter tried to kill a man with his sword. To be sure, they suffered consequences because of their sins, but they did not suffer condemnation. (The Bible exposition commentary.)

I don't mean to say that I have already achieved these things or that I have already reached perfection. But I press on to possess that perfection for which Christ Jesus first possessed me. No, dear brothers and sisters, I have not achieved it, but I focus on this one thing: Forgetting the past and looking forward to what lies ahead, I press on to reach the end of the race and receive the heavenly prize for which God, through Christ Jesus, is calling us. (Philippians 3:12-14 NLT)

One must notice immediately the additional clause rendered in Romans 8:1 in the King James Version.  I have included a couple of notes that well explain the accepted probabilities.  The addition adds the obvious and its omission detracts nothing.

This last clause is wanting in the principal MSS., versions, and fathers. Griesbach has excluded it from the text; and Dr. White says, Certissime delenda; it should most undoubtedly be expunged. Without it, the passage reads thus: There is, therefore, no condemnation to them that are in Christ Jesus; for the law of the Spirit of life, etc. It is a fairly assumed point, that those who are in Christ Jesus, who believe in his name, have redemption in his blood; are made partakers of his Spirit, and have the mind in them that was in him; will not walk after the flesh, but after the Spirit: therefore the thing itself is included in the being in Christ, whether it be expressed or not: and it was probably to make the thing more obvious, that this explanatory clause was added by some copyist, for it does not appear to have made an original part of the text; and it is most likely that it was inserted here from the fourth verse. (Dr. Adam Clarke)

 



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