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Romans 1:26 - The Women Became Men Bookmark

Romans 1:26

"For this reason God gave them over to degrading passions; for their women exchanged the natural function for that which is unnatural," (NASB)

"For this cause God gave them up unto vile affections: for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature:" (KJV)

"That is why God abandoned them to their shameful desires. Even the women turned against the natural way to have sex and instead indulged in sex with each other." (NLT)

Vile affections (πα?θη ατιμι?ας)
Lit., passions of dishonor. Rev., passions. As distinguished from επιθυμι?αι lusts, in Rom 1:24, πα?θη passions, is the narrower and intenser word. Επιθυμι?α is the larger word, including the whole world of active lusts and desires, while the meaning of πα?θος is passive, being the diseased condition out of which the lusts spring. Επιθυμι?αι are evil longings; πα?θη ungovernable affections. Thus it appears that the divine punishment was the more severe, in that they were given over to a condition, and not merely to an evil desire. The two words occur together, 1Th 4:5. "not in lustful passion like the pagans who do not know God and His ways." (NLT)

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire--Edward Gibbon (1737-1794)
The book is famous not only because it is extraordinarily well written, but also because Gibbon offers an explanation for why the Roman Empire fell. This is one of the great historical questions, and, because of the relative lack of written records from the time, one of the most difficult to undertake. Gibbon was not the first to theorize about this. In fact most of his ideas are directly taken from Roman moralists of the 4th and 5th centuries who wrote about it at the time; nor would he be the last; see for example Henri Pirenne's Thesis of the early 20th century.

According to Gibbon, the Roman Empire succumbed to barbarian invasions because of a loss of civic virtue among its citizens.[3] They had become lazy and soft, outsourcing their duties to defend their Empire to barbarian mercenaries, who then became so numerous and ingrained that they were able to take over the Empire. Romans, he believed, had become effeminate, unwilling to live a tougher, "manly" military lifestyle.

In addition Gibbon pointed to Christianity. Christianity, he says, created a belief that a better life existed after death. This fostered indifference to the present among Roman citizens, thus sapping their desire to sacrifice for the Empire. He also believed its comparative pacifism tended to sap the traditional Roman martial spirit.

Finally, like other Enlightenment thinkers, Gibbon held in contempt the Middle Ages as a priest-ridden, superstitious, dark age. It was not until his own age of reason and rational thought, it was believed, that human history could resume its progress. (Wikipedia)

 

"Hallet observes that women are so masculinized that they are said to become men.  She cites telling words to describe their manly practices indicating a negative judgment.  She cites Seneca the Younger (Moral Epistles) who claims that such women, their lusts equal to that of men, "having devised so perverted a type of shamelessness, enter men (penetrate as men) (adeo perversum commentae genus impudicitiae viros ineunt)."" Hallet, Female Homoeroticism, as quoted in Among Women: From Homosocial to the Homoerotic in the Ancient World--Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz, Lisa Auanger

OR Invented a kind of perverted lust that women have slept with women as if they were men.

 

For even the women did change the natural use into that which is against nature; either by prostituting themselves to, and complying with the "sodomitical" embraces of men, in a way that is against nature (h); or by making use of such ways and methods with themselves, or other women, to gratify their lusts, which were never designed by nature for such an use: of these vicious women, and their practices, Seneca (i) speaks, when he says, "libidine veto nec maribus quidem cedunt, pati natae; Dii illas Deoeque, male perdant; adeo perversum commentae, genus impudicitiae, viros ineunt:'' John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible, Dr. John Gill (1690-1771)

 

Romans 1:26

"For this reason God gave them over to degrading passions; for their women exchanged the natural function for that which is unnatural," (NASB)

"For this cause God gave them up unto vile affections: for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature:" (KJV)

"That is why God abandoned them to their shameful desires. Even the women turned against the natural way to have sex and instead indulged in sex with each other." (NLT)

Vile affections (πα?θη ατιμι?ας)
Lit., passions of dishonor. Rev., passions. As distinguished from επιθυμι?αι lusts, in Rom 1:24, πα?θη passions, is the narrower and intenser word. Επιθυμι?α is the larger word, including the whole world of active lusts and desires, while the meaning of πα?θος is passive, being the diseased condition out of which the lusts spring. Επιθυμι?αι are evil longings; πα?θη ungovernable affections. Thus it appears that the divine punishment was the more severe, in that they were given over to a condition, and not merely to an evil desire. The two words occur together, 1Th 4:5. "not in lustful passion like the pagans who do not know God and His ways." (NLT)

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire--Edward Gibbon (1737-1794)
The book is famous not only because it is extraordinarily well written, but also because Gibbon offers an explanation for why the Roman Empire fell. This is one of the great historical questions, and, because of the relative lack of written records from the time, one of the most difficult to undertake. Gibbon was not the first to theorize about this. In fact most of his ideas are directly taken from Roman moralists of the 4th and 5th centuries who wrote about it at the time; nor would he be the last; see for example Henri Pirenne's Thesis of the early 20th century.

According to Gibbon, the Roman Empire succumbed to barbarian invasions because of a loss of civic virtue among its citizens.[3] They had become lazy and soft, outsourcing their duties to defend their Empire to barbarian mercenaries, who then became so numerous and ingrained that they were able to take over the Empire. Romans, he believed, had become effeminate, unwilling to live a tougher, "manly" military lifestyle.

In addition Gibbon pointed to Christianity. Christianity, he says, created a belief that a better life existed after death. This fostered indifference to the present among Roman citizens, thus sapping their desire to sacrifice for the Empire. He also believed its comparative pacifism tended to sap the traditional Roman martial spirit.

Finally, like other Enlightenment thinkers, Gibbon held in contempt the Middle Ages as a priest-ridden, superstitious, dark age. It was not until his own age of reason and rational thought, it was believed, that human history could resume its progress. (Wikipedia)

 

"Hallet observes that women are so masculinized that they are said to become men.  She cites telling words to describe their manly practices indicating a negative judgment.  She cites Seneca the Younger (Moral Epistles) who claims that such women, their lusts equal to that of men, "having devised so perverted a type of shamelessness, enter men (penetrate as men) (adeo perversum commentae genus impudicitiae viros ineunt)."" Hallet, Female Homoeroticism, as quoted in Among Women: From Homosocial to the Homoerotic in the Ancient World--Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz, Lisa Auanger

OR Invented a kind of perverted lust that women have slept with women as if they were men.

 

For even the women did change the natural use into that which is against nature; either by prostituting themselves to, and complying with the "sodomitical" embraces of men, in a way that is against nature (h); or by making use of such ways and methods with themselves, or other women, to gratify their lusts, which were never designed by nature for such an use: of these vicious women, and their practices, Seneca (i) speaks, when he says, "libidine veto nec maribus quidem cedunt, pati natae; Dii illas Deoeque, male perdant; adeo perversum commentae, genus impudicitiae, viros ineunt:'' John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible, Dr. John Gill (1690-1771)

 



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