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Come and Welcome, to Jesus Christ, Part 10

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Come and Welcome, to Jesus Christ, Part 10

Import of Words to Me

“Shall come TO ME.”—To me.  By these words there is further insinuated, though not expressed, a double cause of their coming to him.  First.  There is in Christ a fullness of all-sufficiency of that, even of all that which is needful to make us happy.  Second.  Those that indeed come to him, do therefore come to him that they may receive it at his hand.

First.  For the first of these, there is in Christ a fullness of all-sufficiency of all that, even of all that which is needful to make us happy.  Hence it is said, “For it pleased the Father that in him should all fullness dwell” (Col 1:19).  And again, “Of his fullness have all we received, and grace for grace” (John 1:16).  It is also said of him, that his riches are unsearchable—“the unsearchable riches of Christ” (Eph 3:8).  Hear what he saith of himself, “Riches and honor are with me; yea, durable riches and righteousness.  My fruit is better than gold, yea, than fine gold; and my revenue than choice silver.  I lead in the way of righteousness, in the midst of the paths of judgment; that I may cause those that love me to inherit substance.  And I will fill their treasures” (Prov 8:18–21).

This in general.  But, more particularly,

1.  There is that light in Christ, that is sufficient to lead them out of, and from all that darkness, in the midst of which all others, but them that come to him, stumble, and fall and perish: “I am the light of the world,” saith he, “he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life” (John 8:12).  Man by nature is in darkness, and walketh in darkness, and knows not whither he goes, for darkness hath blinded his eyes; neither can anything but Jesus Christ lead men out of this darkness.  Natural conscience cannot do it; the ten commandments, though in the heart of man, cannot do it.  This prerogative belongs only to Jesus Christ.

2.  There is that life in Christ, that is to be found nowhere else (John 5:40). Life, as a principle in the soul, by which it shall be acted and enabled to do that which through him is pleasing to God.  “He that believeth in,” or cometh to, “me,” saith he, as the Scripture hath said, “out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water” (John 7:38).  Without this life a man is dead, whether he be bad, or whether he be good; that is, good in his own, and other men’s esteem.  There is no true and eternal life but what is in the ME that speaketh in the text.

There is also life for those that come to him, to be had by faith in his flesh and blood.  “He that eateth me, even he shall live by me” (John 6:57).  And this is a life against that death that comes by the guilt of sin, and the curse of the law, under which all men are, and forever must be, unless they eat the ME that speaks in the text.  “Whoso findeth ME,” saith he, “findeth life;” deliverance from that everlasting death and destruction, that, without me, he shall be devoured by (Prov 8:35).  Nothing is more desirable than life, to him that hath in himself the sentence of condemnation; and here only is life to be found.  This life, to wit, eternal life, this life is in his Son; that is, in him that saith in the text, “All that the Father hath given me shall come to me” (1 John 5:10).

3.  The person speaking in the text, is he alone by whom poor sinners have admittance to, and acceptance with the Father, because of the glory of his righteousness, by and in which he presenteth them amiable and spotless in his sight; neither is there any way besides him so to come to the Father:  “I am the way,” says he, “and the truth, and the life; no man cometh to the Father but by me” (John 14:6).  All other ways to God are dead and damnable; the destroying cherubim stand with flaming swords, turning every way to keep all others from his presence (Gen 3:24).  I say, all others but them that come by him.  “I am the door; by me,” saith he, “if any man enter in, he shall be saved” (John 10:9).

The person speaking in the text is HE, and only HE, that can give stable and everlasting peace; therefore, saith he, “My peace I give unto you.”  My peace, which is a peace with God, peace of conscience, and that of an everlasting duration.  My peace, peace that cannot be matched, “not as the world giveth, give I unto you;” for the world’s peace is but carnal and transitory, but mine is Divine and eternal. Hence it is called the peace of God, and that passeth all understanding.

4.  The person speaking in the text hath enough of all things truly spiritually good, to satisfy the desires of every longing soul.  “Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink.”  And to him that is athirst, “I will give of the fountain of the water of life freely” (John 7:37; Rev 21:6).

5.   With the person speaking in the text is power to perfect and defend, and deliver those that come to him for safeguard.  “All power,” saith he, “is given unto me in heaven and earth” (Matt 28:18).

Thus might I multiply instances in this nature in abundance.  But,

Second.  They that in truth do come to him, do therefore come to him that they might receive it at his hand.  They come for light, they come for life, they come for reconciliation with God: they also come for peace, they come that their soul may be satisfied with spiritual good, and that they may be protected by him against all spiritual and eternal damnation; and he alone is able to give them all this, to the filling of their joy to the full, as they also find when they come to him.  This is evident,

1.  From the plain declaration of those that already are come to him.  “Being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God” (Rom 5:1, 2).

2.  It is evident also, in that while they keep their eyes upon him, they never desire to change him for another, or to add to themselves some other thing, together with him, to make up their spiritual joy.  “God forbid,” saith Paul, “that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.”  “Yea, doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ, and be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith” (Phil 3:8, 9).

3.  It is evident also, by their earnest desires that others might be made partakers of their blessedness. “Brethren,” said Paul, “my heart’s desire and prayer to God for Israel is, that they might be saved.”  That is, that way that he expected to be saved himself. As he saith also to the Galatians, “Brethren,” saith he, “I beseech you, be as I am; for I am as ye are;” that is, I am a sinner as you are.  Now, I beseech you, seek for life, as I am seeking of it; as who should say, For there is a sufficiency in the Lord Jesus both for me and you.

4.  It is evident also, by the triumph that such men make over all their enemies, both bodily and ghostly: “Now thanks be unto God,” said Paul, “which always causeth us to triumph in Christ.”  And, “who shall separate us from the love of Christ” our Lord? and again, “O death, where is thy sting?  O grave, where is thy victory?  The sting of death is sin, and the strength of sin is the law; but thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ” (2 Cor 2:14; Rom 8:35; 1 Cor 15:55, 56).

5.  It is evident also, for that they are made by the glory of that which they have found in him, to suffer and endure what the devil and hell itself hath or could invent, as a means to separate them from him.  Again, “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?  as it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long, we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter.  Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.  For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Rom 8:35–39).

“Shall come TO ME.”  Oh! the heart-attracting glory that is in Jesus Christ, when he is discovered, to draw those to him that are given to him of the Father; therefore those that came of old, rendered this as the cause of their coming to him:  “And we beheld his glory, as of the only begotten of the Father” (John 1:14).  And the reason why others come not, but perish in their sins, is for want of a sight of his glory:  “If our gospel be hid, it is hid to them that are lost: in whom the God of this world hath blinded the minds of them that believe not, lest the light of the glorious gospel of Christ, who is the image of God, should shine unto them” (2 Cor 4:3, 4).

There is therefore heart-pulling glory in Jesus Christ, which, when discovered, draws the man to him; wherefore by shall come to me, Christ may mean, when his glory is discovered, then they must come, then they shall come to me.  Therefore, as the true comers come with weeping and relenting, as being sensible of their own vileness, so again it is said, that “the ransomed of the Lord shall return, and come to Zion with songs and everlasting joy upon their heads; they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.”  That is, at the sight of the glory of that grace that shows itself to them now in the face of our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the hopes that they now have of being with him in the heavenly tabernacles.  Therefore it saith again, “With gladness and rejoicing shall they be brought; they shall enter into the King’s palace” (Isa 35:10; 51:11; Psa 45:15).  There is therefore heart-attracting glory in the Lord Jesus Christ, which, when discovered, subjects the heart to the Word, and makes us come to him.

It is said of Abraham, that when he dwelt in Mesopotamia, “the God of glory appeared unto him,” saying, “Get thee out of thy country.”  And what then?  Why, away he went from his house and friends, and all the world could not stay him.  “Now,” as the Psalmist says, “Who is this King of glory?”  he answers, “The Lord, mighty in battle” (Psa 24:8).  And who was that, but he that “spoiled principalities and powers,” when he did hang upon the tree, triumphing over them thereon?  And who was that but Jesus Christ, even the person speaking in the text? Therefore he said of Abraham, “He saw his day. Yea,” saith he to the Jews, “your father Abraham rejoiced to see my day, and he saw it, and was glad” (Col 2:15; James 2:23; John 8:56).

Indeed, the carnal man says, at least in his heart, “There is no form or comeliness in Christ; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him,” (Isa 53:2); but he lies.  This he speaks, as having never seen him.  But they that stand in his house, and look upon him through the glass of his Word, by the help of his Holy Spirit, they will tell you other things.  “But we all,” say they, “with open face, beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory” (2 Cor 3:18).  They see glory in his person, glory in his undertakings, glory in the merit of his blood, and glory in the perfection of his righteousness; yea, heart-affecting, heart-sweetening, and heart-changing glory!

Indeed, his glory is veiled, and cannot be seen but as discovered by the Father (Matt 11:27).  It is veiled with flesh, with meanness of descent from the flesh, and with that ignominy and shame that attended him in the flesh; but they that can, in God’s light, see through these things, they shall see glory in him; yea, such glory as will draw and pull their hearts unto him.

Moses was the adopted son of Pharaoh’s daughter; and for aught I know, had been king at last, had he now conformed to the present vanities that were there at court; but he could not, he would not do it.  Why? What was the matter?  Why!  he saw more in the worst of Christ (bear with the expression), than he saw in the best of all the treasures of the land of Egypt.  He “refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter; choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt; for he had respect unto the recompense of the reward. He forsook Egypt, not fearing the wrath of the king.” But what emboldened him thus to do?  Why, “he endured;” for he had a sight of the person speaking in the text. “He endured, as seeing him who is invisible.”  But I say, would a sight of Jesus have thus taken away Moses’ heart from a crown, and a kingdom, &c., had he not by that sight seen more in him than was to be seen in them? (Heb 11:24–26).

Therefore, when he saith, shall come to me, he means, they shall have a discovery of the glory of the grace that is in him; and the beauty and glory of that is of such virtue, that it constraineth, and forceth, with a blessed violency, the hearts of those that are given to him.

Moses, of whom we spake before, was no child when he was thus taken with the beauteous glory of his Lord. He was forty years old, and so consequently was able, being a man of that wisdom and opportunity as he was, to make the best judgment of the things, and of the goodness of them that was before him in the land of Egypt.  But he, even he it was, that set that low esteem upon the glory of Egypt, as to count it not worth the meddling with, when he had a sight of this Lord Jesus Christ.  This wicked world thinks, that the fancies of a heaven, and a happiness hereafter, may serve well enough to take the heart of such, as either have not the world’s good things to delight in; or that are fools, and know not how to delight themselves therein.  But let them know again, that we have had men of all ranks and qualities, that have been taken with the glory of our Lord Jesus, and have left all to follow him. As Abel, Seth, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Samuel, David, Solomon; and who not, that had either wit or grace, to savor heavenly things?  Indeed none can stand off from him, nor any longer hold out against him to whom he reveals the glory of his grace.

Bunyan, J. (2006). Come and Welcome, to Jesus Christ (Vol. 1, pp. 258–261). Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software.  (Public Domain)

 

 

Come and Welcome, to Jesus Christ, Part 10

Import of Words to Me

“Shall come TO ME.”—To me.  By these words there is further insinuated, though not expressed, a double cause of their coming to him.  First.  There is in Christ a fullness of all-sufficiency of that, even of all that which is needful to make us happy.  Second.  Those that indeed come to him, do therefore come to him that they may receive it at his hand.

First.  For the first of these, there is in Christ a fullness of all-sufficiency of all that, even of all that which is needful to make us happy.  Hence it is said, “For it pleased the Father that in him should all fullness dwell” (Col 1:19).  And again, “Of his fullness have all we received, and grace for grace” (John 1:16).  It is also said of him, that his riches are unsearchable—“the unsearchable riches of Christ” (Eph 3:8).  Hear what he saith of himself, “Riches and honor are with me; yea, durable riches and righteousness.  My fruit is better than gold, yea, than fine gold; and my revenue than choice silver.  I lead in the way of righteousness, in the midst of the paths of judgment; that I may cause those that love me to inherit substance.  And I will fill their treasures” (Prov 8:18–21).

This in general.  But, more particularly,

1.  There is that light in Christ, that is sufficient to lead them out of, and from all that darkness, in the midst of which all others, but them that come to him, stumble, and fall and perish: “I am the light of the world,” saith he, “he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life” (John 8:12).  Man by nature is in darkness, and walketh in darkness, and knows not whither he goes, for darkness hath blinded his eyes; neither can anything but Jesus Christ lead men out of this darkness.  Natural conscience cannot do it; the ten commandments, though in the heart of man, cannot do it.  This prerogative belongs only to Jesus Christ.

2.  There is that life in Christ, that is to be found nowhere else (John 5:40). Life, as a principle in the soul, by which it shall be acted and enabled to do that which through him is pleasing to God.  “He that believeth in,” or cometh to, “me,” saith he, as the Scripture hath said, “out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water” (John 7:38).  Without this life a man is dead, whether he be bad, or whether he be good; that is, good in his own, and other men’s esteem.  There is no true and eternal life but what is in the ME that speaketh in the text.

There is also life for those that come to him, to be had by faith in his flesh and blood.  “He that eateth me, even he shall live by me” (John 6:57).  And this is a life against that death that comes by the guilt of sin, and the curse of the law, under which all men are, and forever must be, unless they eat the ME that speaks in the text.  “Whoso findeth ME,” saith he, “findeth life;” deliverance from that everlasting death and destruction, that, without me, he shall be devoured by (Prov 8:35).  Nothing is more desirable than life, to him that hath in himself the sentence of condemnation; and here only is life to be found.  This life, to wit, eternal life, this life is in his Son; that is, in him that saith in the text, “All that the Father hath given me shall come to me” (1 John 5:10).

3.  The person speaking in the text, is he alone by whom poor sinners have admittance to, and acceptance with the Father, because of the glory of his righteousness, by and in which he presenteth them amiable and spotless in his sight; neither is there any way besides him so to come to the Father:  “I am the way,” says he, “and the truth, and the life; no man cometh to the Father but by me” (John 14:6).  All other ways to God are dead and damnable; the destroying cherubim stand with flaming swords, turning every way to keep all others from his presence (Gen 3:24).  I say, all others but them that come by him.  “I am the door; by me,” saith he, “if any man enter in, he shall be saved” (John 10:9).

The person speaking in the text is HE, and only HE, that can give stable and everlasting peace; therefore, saith he, “My peace I give unto you.”  My peace, which is a peace with God, peace of conscience, and that of an everlasting duration.  My peace, peace that cannot be matched, “not as the world giveth, give I unto you;” for the world’s peace is but carnal and transitory, but mine is Divine and eternal. Hence it is called the peace of God, and that passeth all understanding.

4.  The person speaking in the text hath enough of all things truly spiritually good, to satisfy the desires of every longing soul.  “Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink.”  And to him that is athirst, “I will give of the fountain of the water of life freely” (John 7:37; Rev 21:6).

5.   With the person speaking in the text is power to perfect and defend, and deliver those that come to him for safeguard.  “All power,” saith he, “is given unto me in heaven and earth” (Matt 28:18).

Thus might I multiply instances in this nature in abundance.  But,

Second.  They that in truth do come to him, do therefore come to him that they might receive it at his hand.  They come for light, they come for life, they come for reconciliation with God: they also come for peace, they come that their soul may be satisfied with spiritual good, and that they may be protected by him against all spiritual and eternal damnation; and he alone is able to give them all this, to the filling of their joy to the full, as they also find when they come to him.  This is evident,

1.  From the plain declaration of those that already are come to him.  “Being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God” (Rom 5:1, 2).

2.  It is evident also, in that while they keep their eyes upon him, they never desire to change him for another, or to add to themselves some other thing, together with him, to make up their spiritual joy.  “God forbid,” saith Paul, “that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.”  “Yea, doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ, and be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith” (Phil 3:8, 9).

3.  It is evident also, by their earnest desires that others might be made partakers of their blessedness. “Brethren,” said Paul, “my heart’s desire and prayer to God for Israel is, that they might be saved.”  That is, that way that he expected to be saved himself. As he saith also to the Galatians, “Brethren,” saith he, “I beseech you, be as I am; for I am as ye are;” that is, I am a sinner as you are.  Now, I beseech you, seek for life, as I am seeking of it; as who should say, For there is a sufficiency in the Lord Jesus both for me and you.

4.  It is evident also, by the triumph that such men make over all their enemies, both bodily and ghostly: “Now thanks be unto God,” said Paul, “which always causeth us to triumph in Christ.”  And, “who shall separate us from the love of Christ” our Lord? and again, “O death, where is thy sting?  O grave, where is thy victory?  The sting of death is sin, and the strength of sin is the law; but thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ” (2 Cor 2:14; Rom 8:35; 1 Cor 15:55, 56).

5.  It is evident also, for that they are made by the glory of that which they have found in him, to suffer and endure what the devil and hell itself hath or could invent, as a means to separate them from him.  Again, “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?  as it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long, we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter.  Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.  For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Rom 8:35–39).

“Shall come TO ME.”  Oh! the heart-attracting glory that is in Jesus Christ, when he is discovered, to draw those to him that are given to him of the Father; therefore those that came of old, rendered this as the cause of their coming to him:  “And we beheld his glory, as of the only begotten of the Father” (John 1:14).  And the reason why others come not, but perish in their sins, is for want of a sight of his glory:  “If our gospel be hid, it is hid to them that are lost: in whom the God of this world hath blinded the minds of them that believe not, lest the light of the glorious gospel of Christ, who is the image of God, should shine unto them” (2 Cor 4:3, 4).

There is therefore heart-pulling glory in Jesus Christ, which, when discovered, draws the man to him; wherefore by shall come to me, Christ may mean, when his glory is discovered, then they must come, then they shall come to me.  Therefore, as the true comers come with weeping and relenting, as being sensible of their own vileness, so again it is said, that “the ransomed of the Lord shall return, and come to Zion with songs and everlasting joy upon their heads; they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.”  That is, at the sight of the glory of that grace that shows itself to them now in the face of our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the hopes that they now have of being with him in the heavenly tabernacles.  Therefore it saith again, “With gladness and rejoicing shall they be brought; they shall enter into the King’s palace” (Isa 35:10; 51:11; Psa 45:15).  There is therefore heart-attracting glory in the Lord Jesus Christ, which, when discovered, subjects the heart to the Word, and makes us come to him.

It is said of Abraham, that when he dwelt in Mesopotamia, “the God of glory appeared unto him,” saying, “Get thee out of thy country.”  And what then?  Why, away he went from his house and friends, and all the world could not stay him.  “Now,” as the Psalmist says, “Who is this King of glory?”  he answers, “The Lord, mighty in battle” (Psa 24:8).  And who was that, but he that “spoiled principalities and powers,” when he did hang upon the tree, triumphing over them thereon?  And who was that but Jesus Christ, even the person speaking in the text? Therefore he said of Abraham, “He saw his day. Yea,” saith he to the Jews, “your father Abraham rejoiced to see my day, and he saw it, and was glad” (Col 2:15; James 2:23; John 8:56).

Indeed, the carnal man says, at least in his heart, “There is no form or comeliness in Christ; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him,” (Isa 53:2); but he lies.  This he speaks, as having never seen him.  But they that stand in his house, and look upon him through the glass of his Word, by the help of his Holy Spirit, they will tell you other things.  “But we all,” say they, “with open face, beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory” (2 Cor 3:18).  They see glory in his person, glory in his undertakings, glory in the merit of his blood, and glory in the perfection of his righteousness; yea, heart-affecting, heart-sweetening, and heart-changing glory!

Indeed, his glory is veiled, and cannot be seen but as discovered by the Father (Matt 11:27).  It is veiled with flesh, with meanness of descent from the flesh, and with that ignominy and shame that attended him in the flesh; but they that can, in God’s light, see through these things, they shall see glory in him; yea, such glory as will draw and pull their hearts unto him.

Moses was the adopted son of Pharaoh’s daughter; and for aught I know, had been king at last, had he now conformed to the present vanities that were there at court; but he could not, he would not do it.  Why? What was the matter?  Why!  he saw more in the worst of Christ (bear with the expression), than he saw in the best of all the treasures of the land of Egypt.  He “refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter; choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt; for he had respect unto the recompense of the reward. He forsook Egypt, not fearing the wrath of the king.” But what emboldened him thus to do?  Why, “he endured;” for he had a sight of the person speaking in the text. “He endured, as seeing him who is invisible.”  But I say, would a sight of Jesus have thus taken away Moses’ heart from a crown, and a kingdom, &c., had he not by that sight seen more in him than was to be seen in them? (Heb 11:24–26).

Therefore, when he saith, shall come to me, he means, they shall have a discovery of the glory of the grace that is in him; and the beauty and glory of that is of such virtue, that it constraineth, and forceth, with a blessed violency, the hearts of those that are given to him.

Moses, of whom we spake before, was no child when he was thus taken with the beauteous glory of his Lord. He was forty years old, and so consequently was able, being a man of that wisdom and opportunity as he was, to make the best judgment of the things, and of the goodness of them that was before him in the land of Egypt.  But he, even he it was, that set that low esteem upon the glory of Egypt, as to count it not worth the meddling with, when he had a sight of this Lord Jesus Christ.  This wicked world thinks, that the fancies of a heaven, and a happiness hereafter, may serve well enough to take the heart of such, as either have not the world’s good things to delight in; or that are fools, and know not how to delight themselves therein.  But let them know again, that we have had men of all ranks and qualities, that have been taken with the glory of our Lord Jesus, and have left all to follow him. As Abel, Seth, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Samuel, David, Solomon; and who not, that had either wit or grace, to savor heavenly things?  Indeed none can stand off from him, nor any longer hold out against him to whom he reveals the glory of his grace.

Bunyan, J. (2006). Come and Welcome, to Jesus Christ (Vol. 1, pp. 258–261). Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software.  (Public Domain)

 

 



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