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Romans 3:26 - The Wonder of the Gospel Bookmark

Romans 3:21-26  Must guilty man remain under wrath?  Is the wound for ever incurable?  No; blessed be God, there is another way laid open for us.  This is the righteousness of God; righteousness of his ordaining, and providing, and accepting.  It is by that faith which has Jesus Christ for its object; an anointed Savior, so Jesus Christ signifies.  Justifying faith respects Christ as a Savior, in all his three anointed offices, as Prophet, Priest, and King; trusting in him, accepting him, and cleaving to him: in all these, Jews and Gentiles are alike welcome to God through Christ.  There is no difference, his righteousness is upon all that believe; not only offered to them, but put upon them as a crown, as a robe.  It is free grace, mere mercy; there is nothing in us to deserve such favors.  It comes freely unto us, but Christ bought it, and paid the price.  And faith has special regard to the blood of Christ, as that which made the atonement.  God, in all this, declares his righteousness.  It is plain that he hates sin, when nothing less than the blood of Christ would satisfy for it.  And it would not agree with his justice to demand the debt, when the Surety has paid it, and he has accepted that payment in full satisfaction.  Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

Romans 3:26  For a demonstration of his righteousness - Both of his justice and mercy.  That he might be just - Showing his justice on his own Son.  And yet the merciful justifier of every one that believeth in Jesus.  That he might be just - Might evidence himself to be strictly and inviolably righteous in the administration of his government, even while he is the merciful justifier of the sinner that believeth in Jesus.  The attribute of justice must be preserved inviolate; and inviolate it is preserved, if there was a real infliction of punishment on our Savior.  On this plan all the attributes harmonize; every attribute is glorified, and not one superseded no, nor so much as clouded.  John Wesley

 

"for the demonstration, I say, of His righteousness at the present time, so that He would be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus." (NASB)

"To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus." (KJV)

"for He was looking ahead and including them in what He would do in this present time.  God did this to demonstrate His righteousness, for He Himself is fair and just, and He declares sinners to be right in His sight when they believe in Jesus." (NLT)

"This was also to demonstrate his righteousness in the present time, so that he would be just and the justifier of the one who lives because of Jesus' faithfulness." (NET)

It is a hard thing for me to understand even after all these years how Christ could look from eternity past to beyond the cross and make a way for lost sinners like me.  This is a good place to reflect upon our own lives and to take ownership for our inner emotions!  Is this the way we look at our neighbors and even the people we love?  Or do you find, like I do, that sometimes and even oftentimes that I fall way short of this attitude that was in Christ Jesus (Philippians Chapter 2).  This is not something that the human heart can conjure up via intestinal fortitude or sheer power of the will.  All we can do is confess our sin (the absence of His Grace) in this area of our life.  Why has Christ bestowed such favor upon fallen man?  For "no reason" (the same way Christ was persecuted).  Because of Christ we are justified! It is the same each day of our life!  In now way can we repay by our actions, "not as a result of works."  We cannot take credit for His Grace in any way!  (Ephesians 2:8-9)  This should give way to thankfulness that grows each day as we begin to see the length and breadth of this amazing pardon.

Romans 3:26 
To declare, I say, at this time - To manifest now, by the dispensation of the Gospel, his righteousness, his infinite mercy; and to manifest it in such a way, that he might still appear to be the just God, and yet the justifier, the pardoner, of him who believeth in Jesus.  Here we learn that God designed to give the most evident displays both of his justice and mercy.  Of his justice, in requiring a sacrifice, and absolutely refusing to give salvation to a lost world in any other way; and of his mercy, in providing The sacrifice which his justice required.  Thus, because Jesus was an atonement, a ransom price, for the sin of the world, therefore God can, consistently with his justice, pardon every soul that believeth in Jesus.  This is the full discovery of God’s righteousness, of his wonderful method of magnifying his law and making it honorable; of showing the infinite purity of his justice, and of saving a lost world.   (Dr. Adam Clarke)

Romans 3:26  To declare, I say, at this time, his righteousness,.... This end is further explained, it being to declare the righteousness of God "at this time", under the Gospel dispensation; in which there was such a display of the grace, mercy, and goodness of God:

that he might be just; that is, appear to be so: God is naturally and essentially just in himself; and he is evidentially so in all his works, particularly in redemption by Christ; and when and while he is the justifier of him that believeth in Jesus: Jesus, the Savour, is the object of faith, as he is the Lord our righteousness; the believer in Jesus is a real, and not a nominal one; God is the justifier of such in a declarative way, and God only, though not to the exclusion of the Son and Spirit; and which sentence of justification is pronounced by him on the foot of a perfect righteousness, which neither law nor justice can find fault with, but entirely approve of; and so he appears just and righteous, even though he justifies the sinner and the ungodly.   (Dr. John Gill)

Romans 3:26

To declare ... at this time — now for the first time, under the Gospel.

his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him that believeth in Jesus — Glorious paradox! “Just in punishing,” and “merciful in pardoning,” men can understand; but “just in justifying the guilty,” startles them. But the propitiation through faith in Christ’s blood resolves the paradox and harmonizes the discordant elements. For in that “God hath made Him to be sin for us who knew no sin,” justice has full satisfaction; and in that “we are made the righteousness of God in Him,” mercy has her heart’s delight!

Note,

(1). One way of a sinner’s justification is taught in the Old Testament and in the New alike: only more dimly during the twilight of Revelation; in unclouded light under “its perfect day” (Romans 3:21).

(2). As there is no difference in the need, so is there none in the liberty to appropriate the provided salvation. The best need to be saved by faith in Jesus Christ; and the worst only need that. On this common ground all saved sinners meet here, and will stand for ever (Romans 3:22-24).

(3). It is on the atoning blood of Christ, as the one propitiatory sacrifice which God hath set forth to the eye of the guilty, that the faith of the convinced and trembling sinner fastens for deliverance from wrath. Though he knows that he is “justified freely, by God’s grace,” it is only because it is “through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus” that he is able to find peace and rest even in this (Romans 3:25).

(4). The strictly accurate view of believers under the Old Testament is not that of a company of pardoned men, but of men whose sins, put up with and passed by in the meantime, awaited a future expiation in the fullness of time (Romans 3:25, Romans 3:26; see on Luke 9:31; see on Hebrews 9:15; see on Hebrews 11:39, Hebrews 11:40).  (A Commentary on the Old and New Testaments by Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset and David Brown)

Romans 3:21-26  Must guilty man remain under wrath?  Is the wound for ever incurable?  No; blessed be God, there is another way laid open for us.  This is the righteousness of God; righteousness of his ordaining, and providing, and accepting.  It is by that faith which has Jesus Christ for its object; an anointed Savior, so Jesus Christ signifies.  Justifying faith respects Christ as a Savior, in all his three anointed offices, as Prophet, Priest, and King; trusting in him, accepting him, and cleaving to him: in all these, Jews and Gentiles are alike welcome to God through Christ.  There is no difference, his righteousness is upon all that believe; not only offered to them, but put upon them as a crown, as a robe.  It is free grace, mere mercy; there is nothing in us to deserve such favors.  It comes freely unto us, but Christ bought it, and paid the price.  And faith has special regard to the blood of Christ, as that which made the atonement.  God, in all this, declares his righteousness.  It is plain that he hates sin, when nothing less than the blood of Christ would satisfy for it.  And it would not agree with his justice to demand the debt, when the Surety has paid it, and he has accepted that payment in full satisfaction.  Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

Romans 3:26  For a demonstration of his righteousness - Both of his justice and mercy.  That he might be just - Showing his justice on his own Son.  And yet the merciful justifier of every one that believeth in Jesus.  That he might be just - Might evidence himself to be strictly and inviolably righteous in the administration of his government, even while he is the merciful justifier of the sinner that believeth in Jesus.  The attribute of justice must be preserved inviolate; and inviolate it is preserved, if there was a real infliction of punishment on our Savior.  On this plan all the attributes harmonize; every attribute is glorified, and not one superseded no, nor so much as clouded.  John Wesley

 

"for the demonstration, I say, of His righteousness at the present time, so that He would be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus." (NASB)

"To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus." (KJV)

"for He was looking ahead and including them in what He would do in this present time.  God did this to demonstrate His righteousness, for He Himself is fair and just, and He declares sinners to be right in His sight when they believe in Jesus." (NLT)

"This was also to demonstrate his righteousness in the present time, so that he would be just and the justifier of the one who lives because of Jesus' faithfulness." (NET)

It is a hard thing for me to understand even after all these years how Christ could look from eternity past to beyond the cross and make a way for lost sinners like me.  This is a good place to reflect upon our own lives and to take ownership for our inner emotions!  Is this the way we look at our neighbors and even the people we love?  Or do you find, like I do, that sometimes and even oftentimes that I fall way short of this attitude that was in Christ Jesus (Philippians Chapter 2).  This is not something that the human heart can conjure up via intestinal fortitude or sheer power of the will.  All we can do is confess our sin (the absence of His Grace) in this area of our life.  Why has Christ bestowed such favor upon fallen man?  For "no reason" (the same way Christ was persecuted).  Because of Christ we are justified! It is the same each day of our life!  In now way can we repay by our actions, "not as a result of works."  We cannot take credit for His Grace in any way!  (Ephesians 2:8-9)  This should give way to thankfulness that grows each day as we begin to see the length and breadth of this amazing pardon.

Romans 3:26 
To declare, I say, at this time - To manifest now, by the dispensation of the Gospel, his righteousness, his infinite mercy; and to manifest it in such a way, that he might still appear to be the just God, and yet the justifier, the pardoner, of him who believeth in Jesus.  Here we learn that God designed to give the most evident displays both of his justice and mercy.  Of his justice, in requiring a sacrifice, and absolutely refusing to give salvation to a lost world in any other way; and of his mercy, in providing The sacrifice which his justice required.  Thus, because Jesus was an atonement, a ransom price, for the sin of the world, therefore God can, consistently with his justice, pardon every soul that believeth in Jesus.  This is the full discovery of God’s righteousness, of his wonderful method of magnifying his law and making it honorable; of showing the infinite purity of his justice, and of saving a lost world.   (Dr. Adam Clarke)

Romans 3:26  To declare, I say, at this time, his righteousness,.... This end is further explained, it being to declare the righteousness of God "at this time", under the Gospel dispensation; in which there was such a display of the grace, mercy, and goodness of God:

that he might be just; that is, appear to be so: God is naturally and essentially just in himself; and he is evidentially so in all his works, particularly in redemption by Christ; and when and while he is the justifier of him that believeth in Jesus: Jesus, the Savour, is the object of faith, as he is the Lord our righteousness; the believer in Jesus is a real, and not a nominal one; God is the justifier of such in a declarative way, and God only, though not to the exclusion of the Son and Spirit; and which sentence of justification is pronounced by him on the foot of a perfect righteousness, which neither law nor justice can find fault with, but entirely approve of; and so he appears just and righteous, even though he justifies the sinner and the ungodly.   (Dr. John Gill)

Romans 3:26

To declare ... at this time — now for the first time, under the Gospel.

his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him that believeth in Jesus — Glorious paradox! “Just in punishing,” and “merciful in pardoning,” men can understand; but “just in justifying the guilty,” startles them. But the propitiation through faith in Christ’s blood resolves the paradox and harmonizes the discordant elements. For in that “God hath made Him to be sin for us who knew no sin,” justice has full satisfaction; and in that “we are made the righteousness of God in Him,” mercy has her heart’s delight!

Note,

(1). One way of a sinner’s justification is taught in the Old Testament and in the New alike: only more dimly during the twilight of Revelation; in unclouded light under “its perfect day” (Romans 3:21).

(2). As there is no difference in the need, so is there none in the liberty to appropriate the provided salvation. The best need to be saved by faith in Jesus Christ; and the worst only need that. On this common ground all saved sinners meet here, and will stand for ever (Romans 3:22-24).

(3). It is on the atoning blood of Christ, as the one propitiatory sacrifice which God hath set forth to the eye of the guilty, that the faith of the convinced and trembling sinner fastens for deliverance from wrath. Though he knows that he is “justified freely, by God’s grace,” it is only because it is “through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus” that he is able to find peace and rest even in this (Romans 3:25).

(4). The strictly accurate view of believers under the Old Testament is not that of a company of pardoned men, but of men whose sins, put up with and passed by in the meantime, awaited a future expiation in the fullness of time (Romans 3:25, Romans 3:26; see on Luke 9:31; see on Hebrews 9:15; see on Hebrews 11:39, Hebrews 11:40).  (A Commentary on the Old and New Testaments by Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset and David Brown)



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