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CMF eZine


The online magazine of the Christian Military Fellowship.


7 Impactful Insights for Servant Leadership

7 Impactful Insights for Servant Leadership

7 Impactful insights for Servant Leadership in Business or at Home

As leaders, in a business environment or at home with your children, it’s important that your leadership toolbox is full and robust so that you can access the tools that you need in any given situation.  If you’re familiar with the concept of Situational Leadership, then you’ll understand practical application of the “when and how” to apply certain leadership tools.  If the only tool in your toolbox is a hammer, then your protégés will potentially learn how to lead by responding to your continuous example of anger and rigidity.  While we can agree that there are situations when the hammer is required (as your child is chasing the ball towards the traffic-filled street, when a military regiment is required to move quickly, or when a potential safety mishap is to be averted), it is not the preferred tool to be employed in all situations.

            Where do we first begin to learn to lead?  Sometimes we learn without even knowing that we’re learning.  Our parents, guardians, and teachers were our first examples that we learned from and you can take the good attributes from them, and throw away the not-so-good attributes from them.  As a leader, I’m continuously evaluating myself for effectiveness and often reflect on what should be intuitive and ask myself simple questions for those that have others within their sphere of care such as parents, pastors, or business leaders.  If you call yourself a Christian, and if you have direct or indirect leadership of others, you have to consider the following questions: “How would Jesus lead in this situation?” What does the Servant Leader’s toolbox look like?

“A dispute also arose among them, as to which of them was to be regarded as the greatest. And he said to them, “The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them, and those in authority over them are called benefactors. But not so with you. Rather, let the greatest among you become as the youngest, and the leader as one who serves. For who is the greater, one who reclines at table or one who serves? Is it not the one who reclines at table? But I am among you as the one who serves.” Luke 22:24-27 ESV

1.  Love

How important is it to have love in your toolbox?  It’s so important, that Jesus highlights this as the greatest over all of the commandments.

“And he said to him, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments depend all the Law and the Prophets.’” Matthew 22:37-40

But how are we to lead others from a position of love?  Love compels us to do things that are often out of the ordinary, or are beyond the capacities or expectations of our role.  In the business environment, this might pertain to a situation where a person needs to leave work, for one reason or another for what is only revealed as a pressing personal issue.  However, the deadline is rapidly approaching and that person is one of the only people that can answer the data call.  What do you do?  Do you decide that the needs of the business are greater than the needs of the employee, or do you let love lead and excuse the person knowing that the data call will be critically impacted?  As a parent, this is easier as we love our children as parents do but as a business leader, this might be an uncomfortable area for you as you learn to love your subordinates.  Keep love at the ready in your leadership toolbox and relationships will be deeply rooted in trust and respect, and work productivity can flourish as a result.

“So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.” Matthew 7:12 ESV

2.  Lead With (or from) Weakness

We want our subordinates or protégés to see us as confident and strong leaders, exuding qualities and traits from which they can emulate.  Any signs of weakness can reduce their respect for you, as they become disappointed as the chinks in your armor are revealed, right?  Wrong!  Studies have shown that in a work environment, subordinates are more likely to respond to a personable and human boss that can admit and take ownership of his or her mistakes publicly and with humility.  This fosters an environment of inclusion and productivity is directly impacted in a positive manner.[1]

“But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me.” 2 Corinthians 12:9 ESV

[1] https://hbr.org/2014/05/the-best-leaders-are-humble-leaders

3.  Empathize

From the time that we are children, God has blessed us with a natural ability to care for one another, on an internal and often subconscious level.  We are all connected through this internal bond that can be associated with the “mother’s instinct” where “mama bear or papa bear” are revealed when their cubs are found to be in dangerous situations.  We place ourselves in the paws of our cubs, or the feet of others as we empathize with them in their given situation, whatever that may be.

“Let love be genuine. Abhor what is evil; hold fast to what is good. Love one another with brotherly affection. Outdo one another in showing honor. Do not be slothful in zeal, be fervent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints and seek to show hospitality.” Romans 12:9-13

But how are we to lead with empathy?  We have deadlines to meet and requirements to uphold.  Adults are adults and professionals are expected to carry their own weight.  We’re not running daycare centers (well, maybe we are but you get the point).  Does empathy and compassion have any room in a production or military environment?  Should it?  Let’s “take-it-to-the-book” and see what our leadership examples have shown us:

“And Jesus called them to him and said to them, “You know that those who are considered rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them. But it shall not be so among you. But whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be slave of all. For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” Mark 10:42-45

As we serve others, we’re to do so from a position of empathy, where regardless of the business requirements, establishing and fostering the human element, as with a “family first” regimen, workers are more likely to support the infrastructure and provide quality workmanship and pride in delivered product as a result.

4.  Sympathize

Empathy and sympathy go hand-in-hand.  Jesus compels us to address each other’s needs and carry the burdens of others on a personal level.  Where we’re stumbling and find ourselves in a position of need, we’re required to help each other through whatever circumstances those may be. 

“But if anyone has the world's goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God's love abide in him?” John 3:17 ESV

But how are we to lead from a position of sympathy?  We can’t be expected to physically help out everybody in our shop through situations of need, can we?  Everybody arrives to work with their own sets of struggles that they’re working through, how can I help them all and still be a productive leader?

The answer may be simple, and may not require much time but for the body of the workforce, as leaders we have one crucial sympathetic tool in our toolbox, and that is the power of prayer!  Pray for your coworkers, your students, your flock, your soldiers, and your children.  With a sympathetic ear, hear their trials and pray for them individually and collectively.

“First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.” 1 Timothy 2:1-4

5.  Wisdom

The Bible tells us that if we’re to seek with our whole hearts, then we’ll find our answers there, within the text.  Wisdom and discernment not only assist us in making critical ethical and moral decisions, but if we rely on wisdom before we react, then our ability to lead others through every situation becomes more predictable, credible, and sustainable. 

“Blessed is the one who finds wisdom, and the one who gets understanding, for the gain from her is better than gain from silver and her profit better than gold. She is more precious than jewels, and nothing you desire can compare with her. Long life is in her right hand; in her left hand are riches and honor. Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.”  Proverbs 3:13-18 ESV

As somebody that serves their followership by leading with wisdom in their toolbox, we then create an environment of approachability and an open forum for creativity and ideas to flow freely through the workplace.  This methodology impacts a culture and the work culture that you create through your leadership traits then permeates through all functions and elements of the business, or church, or battleground, or household.

6.  Active Listening

Have you ever heard the expression about having two ears and one mouth for a reason?  Active listening can aid in your servant leadership attributes by allowing your responses to be in alignment with the needs of the persons or body that you’re serving.  Listening is a vitally important tool to have in our leadership toolbox as it’s one of the first things that we’re taught as children.  “Pay attention” or “listen to me” are words that I heard often in my early childhood and leadership development.  We want our protégés to hear, and practically apply our instructions in order to accomplish tasks.  And with that reasoning in mind, we’re to offer them the same benefit by actively listening to their needs, hearing and affirming their circumstances (empathy and/or sympathy), and enacting a course of action to assist in the resolution of their needs.

“Know this, my beloved brothers: let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger;” James 1:19 ESV

7.  Offer Sage Advice

You know what they say about advice and opinions?  Everybody has an opinion and with regards to advice, you’ll want to consider the source.  As leaders, we are the source!  So for those to consider, listen to and follow your advice, you’ll want to establish credibility by lovingly offering sage advice to your employees, soldiers, protégés, or children.

The apostle Paul offers:  “Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear.” Ephesians 4:29

To have the above tools for your toolbox and the knowledge of each is just one element to the entirety of your leadership strategy.  The other elements of your leadership strategy arrive during your “boots-on-ground” real world practical application of tool usage in your work, home, church, or military environments.  The ability to incorporate critical thinking skills and discern the tools to employ in dynamic and fluid environments will help to sharpen you as a leader, and benefit greatly those in your charge.  Until next time, think of ways where you can be of service to those that you lead.

Shalom.

Lead by Example

Lead by Example

Lead by Example

Why is leading by example so important?  6 Attributes to Consider While Walking in Leadership

Shepherd the flock of God that is among you, exercising oversight, not under compulsion, but willingly, as God would have you; not for shameful gain, but eagerly; not domineering over those in your charge, but being examples to the flock. And when the chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the unfading crown of glory. Likewise, you who are younger, be subject to the elders. Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one another, for “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.” 1 Peter 5:2-5

We hear it all the time: “Lead By Example” but do we ever take the time to conduct a self-check to ensure that we have an understanding of the breadth and depth of the application?  What makes leading by example so important to the hierarchal health of the organization?  In order to answer the questions, we’ll need to break down the approach through the lens of others.  Firstly, we need to consider the “whys” in order to understand why leading by example is important to our flock, our subordinates, our children and our followership.  Then we need to understand the application of the “whys” so that we can fill the gaps.

1.  Modeled Traits

How do our children first begin to learn?  From the time that we are babies, naturally we begin to behave in ways that we learn from our environment.  Some things are inherent and God-given.  Have you ever watched an infant stretch and yawn?  How do they know how to do that?  They just do, they didn’t have to model your behavior in order to learn how to do those things.  But what about other learned habits and traits, where do they first learn how to behave and how is their journey of personality and character development shaped?  It’s shaped through your behaviors and your habits.  When you get angry, they cry.  When you are happy and playful, they respond in kind (usually).  They learn how to treat others and how to make decisions by your example and your tutelage.  Plan accordingly and be aware of the weight of your role.  Jesus compels us to model His behavior, as this is pleasing to the Lord as evidenced through scripture:

“The saying is trustworthy: If anyone aspires to the office of overseer, he desires a noble task. Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. He must manage his own household well, with all dignity keeping his children submissive, for if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God's church?” 1 Timothy 3:1-7.

As parents of young children, we’re thrust into the office of overseer, whether we’re prepared for it or not and the child will flourish and naturally follow your example.

In leadership, whether explicit or implicit, all eyes are on you, constantly measuring whether or not you’re to be trusted, and whether or not you’re worthy of a followership.  Think about how you gauge a good leader.  What attributes do they possess that you respond to and want to follow?  How do you behave if your boss or church pastor is not practicing what they preach?  How do you view that leader and how does that effect your perception of the organization?  Your decisions and behaviors have a direct impact on the lives, perceptions, and character development of your followership.

While those are the “whys”, what do they imply (in our leadership behavior)?

2.  Responsibility

Where we’re responsible for the well-being of others, we have a greater level of responsibility, not only for the “care and feeding” of those within our sphere of influence, but for continuous improvement and professional (and often personal) development of those within our care.  Having and understanding our roles as leaders, having responsibility for others causes us to place the needs of others before our own. 

“Let no one despise you for your youth, but set the believers an example in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, in purity.” 1 Timothy 4:12

3.  Sacrifice

Placing the needs of others before our own will ultimately lead to times of self-sacrifice.  We have to give of ourselves for the betterment of others.  In the new-baby example, we sacrifice many things as new parents, primarily our sleep as we adjust to the new “baby-schedule”.  As leaders in the military, business, or church we sacrifice our time as we pour into our subordinates, protégés, or our flock.

“I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” John 10:11

4. Integrity

The definition of integrity is: “The quality of being honest and having strong moral principles.”  You may have also heard the application of integrity as “doing the right thing, even when nobody is looking.”  Either definition gives you a moral and ethical framework and compass for which to gauge your decisions and your activities.  Acting with integrity is important in the eyes of your followership as it creates and nurtures trust within your relationship and can foster as a culture of trust within your organization.  Having integrity in your actions, and being trustworthy to your subordinates creates an open and healthy work environment for your people.

“My lips will not speak falsehood, and my tongue will not utter deceit. Far be it from me to say that you are right; till I die I will not put away my integrity from me. I hold fast my righteousness and will not let it go; my heart does not reproach me for any of my days.” Job 27:4-6

5.  Consistency

Above all, we need to remain consistent.  Consistency provides a safe-haven within a messy and inconsistent world.  Where you’re consistent in your behaviors as a leader, your followership will benefit.  If you’ve displayed that you’re approachable, methodical, intentional, and deliberate then your followership will know where they stand with you, and can be made to feel comfortable to confide in you during times of indecision or workplace conflict.

Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain.” 1 Corinthians 15:58

6.  Continuous Improvement

How do you measure up?  They say that a true scholar never stops learning. I’ll say the same of a true student of leadership, in that we never stop improving or adding tools to our leadership toolbox.  Whether you lead at home, as a parent, or you lead in your church ministry, your role at work, or just in general as the “leader” within your sphere of influence as somebody that people trust to make decisions; we never stagnate, we never stop improving ourselves as the landscape of leadership is an often fluid and dynamic environment.  The ways we lead in the military, don’t always transition to the ways we lead in our homes, or in our civilian work occupation, or in our church ministry leadership role.  Understanding situational leadership implies a well-rounded approach so in that, we need to stay relevant and up to date with the traditions of leadership so that we can continue to lead effectively in our roles.  What courses are you enrolled in for this year?  How are you improving in your role?

“About this we have much to say, and it is hard to explain, since you have become dull of hearing. For though by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to teach you again the basic principles of the oracles of God. You need milk, not solid food,” Hebrews 5:11-12

Shalom.

Operation: Clear the Scatter

Operation: Clear the Scatter

Operation: Clear the Scatter, 4 Tips for Effective Organizational Leadership

Do you ever have those days where it seems that all you’ve done since you walked in the door is put out fires?  Whether at work or in your home life, there are those days where it seems that you don’t get the chance to catch up and breathe!  Have you ever had entire weeks like that?  Has it ever (or is it now) become the work environment that you live in as your Modis Operandi?  When faced with a few moments of quiet time (uh…what’s that?), are you able to climb out of the proverbial hole and get ahead of the tasks at hand?

Military leaders are groomed from an early age to “improvise, adapt, and overcome” as the dynamic and fluid environment that they perform and excel in regularly dictates.  But what about business leaders that are thrown into a fast paced and rigorous work environment without ever having been exposed to that kind of workflow?  How do they cope?  What do they do when burnout sets in (because it will)? 

Here are 4 tools that can help to ease the burden.  They might take some time to implement completely before you can see a change in your workload and your stress levels, and it takes daily intentional activities, but there is light is at the end of the tunnel!

Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.  (Philippians 4:6 ESV)

1.  Prepare for Battle

How you begin your day is probably one of the most important social and psychological exercises that you may or may not give intentional credence towards.  So let’s back up a little bit.  Are you getting enough sleep?  I probably don’t have to remind you but studies show that we need at least eight hours of sleep per night in order to obtain and maintain a healthy balance.  In the next sections below, we’ll discuss some schedule management tools that will help you if you’re a “night owl” or just can’t seem to get to sleep before midnight.

When your alarm goes off in the morning, what do you do?  Do you hit snooze so many times that you oversleep?  If you do, you know that leaping out of bed, brushing your teeth (let’s hope) and throwing a half toasted bagel in your mouth as you scramble out the door is not the best way to start your day.  Beginning your day in “late mode” does not put you in the most beneficial frame of mind, and if you’re beginning your day that way, chaos can only ensue and the other drivers on the road will get to feel your wrath as you wrestle through traffic with a chaotic mindset.  Safe?  Probably not.

As challenging as it may be, give yourself plenty of time to get up, out of bed and into the shower so that you’re not having to rush out the door in the morning.  If you like to hit the snooze button, set your alarm for 10 minutes earlier than you have to get up.  That way you can still hit snooze and get up on time.  A better activity is to be able to sit down and eat your breakfast before you leave the house but let’s be real here…self-improvement and habit changing activities take baby steps!

If possible, spend some quiet time with God.  Daily devotionals only take about 5 – 10 minutes as you can read while you eat, ponder and sit in the message, and pray for a fruitful day.  Sitting with the Lord at the beginning of your day will help to set the stage of calmness as you then begin to assess your daily schedule.  If sitting quietly with the Lord and reading a daily devotional over breakfast is too challenging for you to implement at first, consider driving to work with the radio off, or with some Christian music and then pray while you drive (with your eyes open, please).  The Lord loves to engage with you at any time of the day, in any situation and you don’t need to be in a certain posture in order for the Lord to hear your prayer.  Just talk, He’s listening!

Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving.  (Colossians 4:2 ESV)

2.  Get Organized

If you’re one of those people that has a hard time cleaning your room, I know that the concept of organization can be scary and maybe causes you some anxiety.  You’ve managed to “make it work” your entire life so what’s the big deal if your desk/car/kitchen are a little messy, what does that have to do with your quality of work?  I call it “swimming through the muck”.  The “messy-ness” of your life, believe it or not, does have bleed-over into your organizational thinking and prioritization, and can have an impact on the overall workmanship of your products.  Not to worry, we’ll eat this elephant one bite at a time and believe it or not the tasks of organization are not very daunting.  You may even find that the process is relatively simple, easy to follow, and liberating.

A.  Start with your computer.  Does your desktop look like the sea of lost files?  Is your desktop filled with different types of files that are used for different reasons?  Have you completely blocked out the desktop theme so you don’t even see the peaceful picture anymore?  If so, is the “search” functionality your favorite friend?  Believe it or not, there are ways to improve upon your file management system.

i.  Create folders!  Organize your files by subject, or function such as: Supplies, Finance, HR, Training, Draft Documents, etc.  In doing so, you’ll begin to learn how best to compartmentalize your mind so that when you need to find the latest files to work from, you won’t need to stress out or search, you’ll know right where to go!

ii.  Use your calendar!  This may seem to be common sense but segregate your day by what’s on your calendar, and work the items that are on your calendar for that timeslot only.  Now you might be saying…”that won’t work in my workplace”, but I’ll show you how it can when we discuss prioritization and Critical Chain Project Management.

iii.  Prioritize your tasks!  Put out the quick “fires” but then build time into your calendar to catch up on the items that you’ve been avoiding.  Use that time on your calendar for configuration management of your files, or to finalize documents, or to respond to emails.  Be intentional and be consistent and most importantly, do it!

a).  Critical Chain Project Management allows you to identify the highest priority items, and then segregate them, and where possible, work those items ONLY.  This means you might have to turn off your phone and set up your out-of-office reply.  Segregate yourself as you are on the “Critical Path” burning down tasks that are critical to the success of the delivery.  Others need to be aware of the Critical Chain and where they can help you to be segregated.  You might need to delegate many things and empower others in your organization to do some tasks that you normally would do, during the time that you’re segregated working on prioritized critical tasks.  I know this can be hard to do for us control freaks, but that’s an issue for another article.

For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.  (Jeremiah 29:11 ESV)

B.  Make lists!  You’d be surprised how a simple checklist can help you to manage the tasks at hand, especially when they seemingly become overwhelming.  Using your day planner, in conjunction with your calendar, or even just a piece of regular old paper, write out your tasks that you need to accomplish, as framed by the subject area of your calendar.  Don’t overdo it and keep your lists compartmentalized to the task that you’re working based on what you’ve placed on your calendar for that timeframe.  Once you complete the task, check it off of your list!

Making lists eases your mind because it takes the scatter out of your mind and puts it on the paper, which then becomes manageable and less daunting.  Why stay awake at night wondering what to do the next day with the multitude of overwhelming tasks running around your brain?  Take a couple of minutes to get the tasks out of your head, and onto the manageable paper.

3.  Turn Off Social Media

This should be a “no-brainer”.  If you’re that OCD person that can’t avoid the pressure to not address the blinking light on your phone, then put your phone in a drawer, or keep it out of sight as you focus on the critical path.  Turn off all alerts, visible and audible so that you’re not tempted by the never-ending persistence of the blinking light.  If there’s an emergency, your family can call your place of business on a separate line.  This must be an intentional and disciplined approach if you aspire to clear the scatter effectively.

 

 

4.  Be Still and Know

Be still before the Lord and wait patiently for him; fret not yourself over the one who prospers in his way, over the man who carries out evil devices!  (Psalm 37:7 ESV)

At the beginning of the day, and all throughout the day we have to breathe.  We can’t be effective leaders if we’re constantly running at a highly chaotic pace.  If you’re functioning in that mode continuously, it’s not healthy for you, or for your peers and subordinates as you create and place undue pressures on them.  Manage your workload accordingly, and you’ll make for a more harmonious leader that can help others to manage their workloads efficiently and effectively.

Be still, and know that I am God. I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth!  (Psalm 46:10 ESV)

 In doing so, God wants you to slow down and be still, and know that He is God.  Your identity is not in the ability to meet the deadline.  Your identity is not in the salary that you make nor in the car that you drive.  Your identity is not found within the stripes on your sleeve or the device on your collar.  Your identity, first and foremost is as a loving child of the one true living God.  The almighty creator that first breathed life into you and continues to be the very breath that fills your lungs on a daily basis.  Be still in that, feel the overwhelming love and rest in the peace that is promised eternity, that which is found in Christ Jesus.

Shalom.


Christian Military Fellowship

An Indigenous Ministry • Discipleship • Prayer • Community • Support
Encouraging Men and Women in the United States Armed Forces, and their families, to love and serve the Lord Jesus Christ.

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